Will advertising rates crumble in podcasting?

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Those of us who remember the Web 1.0 world also remember when you could get decent CPM rates for banner ads. Yes, that seems like a lifetime ago, but prior to the Great Recession and the introduction of the iPhone and social media, website owners and bloggers could make decent money on internet advertising.

Tom Webster poses the question as to whether the same thing can happen in the podcasting business:

Great content is expensive to produce, and great advertising native to that content’s form and delivery is well worth a premium. But if several large players in the space start taking poorly executed, irrelevant ads at ultra-low (for podcasting) CPMs, that’s going to have repercussions on the economic feasibility of great audio content.

And that, my friends, is what worries me the most.

Ad delivery technology is progressing rapidly in podcasting, with companies like Megaphone leading the way with dynamic ad insertion and programmatic ads that make it easy to pump ads through tons of podcast episodes. Over time, ad rates for these ads will come down, and then we’ll see if podcasters can still command premium CPMs for host-read ads. So far, the intimacy of podcasting and listener loyalty to hosts has led to excellent performance for these ads. Time will tell . . .

  

Apps for home sellers to sell quickly

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If you’re looking for quick cash for your house, you now have several apps to choose from. The business plan for these apps are interesting:

Think of them as house-flippers that work for you. Sellers fill out an online questionnaire, and an iBuyer uses proprietary modeling to assess the home’s value. The company then makes an all-cash offer within 72 hours, sight unseen. (The iBuyer keeps a 6 to 10 percent commission off the price.) They make light renovations and relist the house at a markup. Home buyers can browse and make an offer via app.

It will be interesting to see how much participation these apps generate. There’s a lot of VC money behind these startups.

  

Airbnb in fierce battle with cities trying to regulate the service

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Airbnb has had an enormous impact on the travel and hospitality industries, offering unprecedented choice and convenience to travelers all around the world. Whether you need a bed for the night or a vacation rental for a month, the service provides a variety of options. Meanwhile, homeowners and anyone having a spare room can now monetize the asset very easily.

These conveniences, however, have disrupted markets in dense cities like New York while also creating incidents where users created damage and noise problems.

As a result, cities like New York are trying to crack down, and now Airbnb seems poised to fight back. It will be interesting to see how this plays out.

  

Schools and teachers using crowdfunding

Here’s a great video on how schools and teachers are using crowdfunding to fund things like equipment and other projects that helps schools and students.

  

Twitter gets serious about video

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Twitter is introducing a new program that will enable users to monetize videos they post on Twitter. The program is quite attractive with a 70/30 revenue split in favor if the user, and the program is also non-exclusive. This will provide real incentives for celebrities and others with large Twitter followings to use Twitter for their videos along with YouTube and other platforms. Maybe the Twitter brass is finally figuring out how to monetize their users.